18th century ladies

18th century paintings, fashion plates and dresses.

fripperiesandfobs:

Robe à la française, 1773-80
From Museums of Florence

fripperiesandfobs:

Robe à la française, 1773-80

From Museums of Florence

godsavethefrenchqueen:

Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola)

(via mistralienne)

1770s floral robe à l’Anglaise costume (See my blog for more)

Photos: Jarno Manninen, Roosa Sippola

Also, now for sale on Etsy!

mimic-of-modes:

The young Elvire playing with her cat. She is Dressed in a galant Pierrot and Coiffed with a Hat à la d’Hericort.- Galerie des Modes, 61e Cahier, 1ere Figure


Le Magasin des Modes, 20 May 1787

mimic-of-modes:

The young Elvire playing with her cat. She is Dressed in a galant Pierrot and Coiffed with a Hat à la d’Hericort.- Galerie des Modes, 61e Cahier, 1ere Figure

Le Magasin des Modes, 20 May 1787

Madame Sophie de France François-Hubert Drouais.
Date unknown, probably 1770s
Jane, née Belchier, Wife of Richard Huddleston by Jean-Marc Nattier.
1766
Archduchess Maria Antonia of Austria, the later Queen Marie Antoinette of France, at the age of 16 years, by Joseph Kreutzinger.
1771
Journal de la mode et du goût, 25th of July, 1790.
A woman wearing a caraco of white linen with floral embroidery. 
a-l-ancien-regime:

Marie Antoinette and her children in front of a tree by François Dumont.
1790
A -contemporary of the Revolution- representation of the royal family 
Any representation of royalty was prohibited by the Revolution. Since August 10, 1792, the royal statues in public places were removed. The Convention directed in 1793 the destruction of royal portraits. For any image, however small it may was, had a dangerous power of evocation. The fury of the revolutionary regime to destroy and prohibit any representation of the royalty and any portrait of a member of the dynasty, continued long beyond the Terror and is explained as a profound necessity to ensure the grip of the new ideas.
Despite his awkwardness, this miniature portrait bears witness to the attachment of the people’s feelings to the royal family. The portrait in its simplicity,  evokes a vanished world  a far cry from the revolutionary era atmosphere.
© Photo RMN-Grand Palais - M. Bellot
(via Louis XVI et sa famille - L’Histoire par l’image - Plein cadre)

a-l-ancien-regime:

Marie Antoinette and her children in front of a tree by François Dumont.

1790

A -contemporary of the Revolution- representation of the royal family 

Any representation of royalty was prohibited by the Revolution. Since August 10, 1792, the royal statues in public places were removed. The Convention directed in 1793 the destruction of royal portraits. For any image, however small it may was, had a dangerous power of evocation. The fury of the revolutionary regime to destroy and prohibit any representation of the royalty and any portrait of a member of the dynasty, continued long beyond the Terror and is explained as a profound necessity to ensure the grip of the new ideas.

Despite his awkwardness, this miniature portrait bears witness to the attachment of the people’s feelings to the royal family. The portrait in its simplicity,  evokes a vanished world  a far cry from the revolutionary era atmosphere.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais - M. Bellot

(via Louis XVI et sa famille - L’Histoire par l’image - Plein cadre)

Madame de Pompadour by François Boucher.
Circa 1750